2017-06-19T14:49:46+00:00Pritzker Hageman, P.A.Fred Pritzker 45 S 7th St, #2950 Minneapolis, MN, 55402 U.S.A +1.612.338.0202

Question: My daughter was driving her car on a country road when a grain truck traveling in the opposite direction turned left without yielding. My daughter broadsided the truck, skidded into another car that was waiting at a stop sign and rolled into a ditch. The roof of her car collapsed and broke her neck.  She is paralyzed from the neck down (quadriplegia C1-C2) and is dependent on a ventilator to breathe. How much is my daughter’s truck accident case worth?

Answer by Attorney Eric Hageman:  I would need to conduct an independent investigation of the rollover accident and other factors to answer your question, but in cases where a truck driver is at fault, the accident victim may have the legal right to sue the truck driver, owner of the truck, owner of the grain and others for compensation. This means there may be several insurance policies involved, and this affects the amount of money one can expect to recover.

The amount of compensation is always based on a number of variables. In cases where the accident victim is permanently paralyzed, the expected future medical (hospital, rehabilitation, other) and cost-of-care expenses are generally very high. In addition, there is often a substantial loss of future income. A lawsuit against the truck driver and others should seek enough money to cover these expenses and losses, as well as compensating the accident victim for pain and suffering, disability, disfigurement, emotional distress, loss of quality of life and other damages.

Do not sign anything without consulting a truck accident attorney.

You can contact me for a free case review here. I have handled many accident claims where a commercial truck caused serious bodily injury or wrongful death.

Our law firm represents accident victims nationwide in personal injury and wrongful death lawsuits against trucking companies and truck drivers. The firm has won millions for its clients, including recent recoveries in Minnesota, Michigan and Kansas.