2018-01-11T14:00:09+00:00Pritzker Hageman, P.A.Fred Pritzker 45 S 7th St, #2950 Minneapolis, MN, 55402 U.S.A +1.612.338.0202

Salmonella from ground beef?

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Salmonella Bacteria

A Scarborough, Maine-based grocery chain, recalled fresh ground beef products due to possible contamination with Salmonella Typhimurium.  14 people in Maine, New York, New Hampshire and Vermont have reported Salmonella poisoning due to the meat. Our attorneys are available for a free consultation regarding a Salmonella lawsuit, and have won money for Salmonella Typhimurium victims stricken in other outbreaks.

The various ground beef packages bear sell-by dates of Dec. 17, 2011 or earlier and were sold at stores throughout Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York and Vermont. FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Some of those sickened in the outbreak ate food made with beef. If the store had adequately cooked the beef, no one would have become ill.  In cases like this, we have pursued claims of negligence.

Ground Beef Salmonella

The PFGE pattern associated with this outbreak is reported rarely in the U.S. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported 14 ill persons with an indistinguishable PFGE pattern, and 11 of those individuals reported consuming ground beef. Seven individuals were hospitalized, which is a large percentage for a Salmonella outbreak. Ten of the 14 case-patients reported purchasing ground beef at the implicated stores in Maine, New York, New Hampshire and Vermont between Oct. 12 and Nov. 20.  No other product description is available at this time.

The outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium has initially tested resistant to multiple commonly prescribed antibiotics, including drug classes such as beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, and cephalosporins. Antibiotic resistant foodborne bacteria, such as this strain of Salmonella, are becoming more and more common, and this is cause for alarm. Food safety experts caution that overuse of antibiotics in farmed-for-food animals (chicken, pigs and cows) is one of the primary culprits of the rise of these antibiotic-resistant ‘superbugs’. Often when buying ready-to-eat options from a grocery store customers do not consider where the different components of the product came from. This is why an attorney is an advantage, they are able to investigate the product, tracing back to it’s original farm or grower and see if the producer has a history of distributing tainted product.

Salmonella Outbreaks