Associated Eye Care in Stillwater, MN told the Star Tribune that 559 patients of their patients received New England Compounding Center (NECC) products since May.  The company said the clinic used 4 NECC medications, including an injectable drug.

Contact attorney Fred Pritzker for a free consultation here regarding a lawsuit against New England Compounding Center.

Associated Eye Care is one of 129 clinics in Minnesota that received injectable drugs from New England Compounding Center (NECC) that could pose a potential risk of meningitis or other infections, according to the Minnesota Department of Health.

Fungal infections of the eye can cause vision loss that may be permanent. Attorney Fred Pritzker, who recently won over $40,000,000 for clients injured by another unsafe medical product, is representing patients who had injections with NECC medication. He is concerned that patients get compensation for medical expenses, lost income, pain and emotional distress.

Fred recently won almost one million dollars in a compounding pharmacy error lawsuit. He hopes the current litigation will result in significant changes in the compounding pharmacy industry.  Compounded medications are supposed to be made on a patient-by-patient basis per a doctor’s prescription. This is not what happened with NECC. The company made huge batches of medications and sold them in bulk to clinics and hospitals throughout the United States. It was acting like a pharmaceutical company but did not have FDA oversight. All of the evidence suggests that NECC was selling medications in violation of federal law.

Certainly the clinics are partly to blame for the fungal infection threat. They should have made sure medications they were injecting into people’s bodies, particularly the eyes and spine, were coming from a company that was not violating any laws.