Meningitis lawyer Fred Pritzker filed one of the first lawsuits against New England Compounding Center (NECC), a compounding pharmacy located in Framingham, MA. He is representing over 40 patients harmed by NECC steroid injection medications.

During the spinal meningitis outbreak linked to NECC medications, Fred has been quoted by several national and global news media. Today, he was quoted in The Guardian in an article about one of his clients, Traci Maccoux, a 22-year-old Minnesota woman who was diagnosed with Aspergillus meningitis.

Maccoux is now taking legal action against NECC and is being represented by Fred Pritzker, an attorney based in Minneapolis. Pritzker, who is representing about 40 of those affected by the health scandal, has described it as a example of “corporate irresponsibility abetted by regulatory failure”, and has called on Congress to set up a compensation fund for people injured and the families of those killed by the outbreak.
(“Meningitis victim tells of pain, panic and anger over contaminated injection“)

Two days ago, he was again quoted in a Guardian article about the outbreak:

Fred Pritzker, an attorney representing 40 patients across several states who have been affected by the outbreak, said that the documents could expand the scope of the lawsuits against NECC. He has filed one lawsuit already, but expects those lawsuits to be consolidated into one multi-district litigation action to be dealt with in one court.

“This is not an isolated case,” said Pritzker. “This is a pattern practice of abuse.”

He said: “It could expand the scope of the lawsuits to include punitive damages. The real problem is that the company is not going to have enough assets to cover all those affected. It is a very complicated mess, and it is usually the victims, the families of people who have been killed or people who have suffered horrible injury who are left out.”
(“Meningitis: drug firm escaped tough sanctions before outbreak, files show“)

Attorney Fred Pritzker can be contacted for a free consultation here.

Both articles were written by Karen McVeigh.