Attorney Fred Pritzker and his Kidney Failure Litigation Team recently won a $45 million lawsuit settlement for clients who suffered kidney failure from an over-the-counter medical product. This settlement is confidential, so we are not able to provide a lot of information.

Product Causes Acute Phosphate Nephopathy

Within days or weeks of ingesting the product, our clients began experiencing kidney problems that quickly developed into kidney failure. The specific type of kidney failure our clients developed is called acute phosphate nephropathy, a type of kidney failure (renal failure) that is quite rare.

Because acute phosphate nephropathy is rare, the FDA and CDC quickly realized there was an outbreak and that the source of the illnesses was the product. Many of our clients will be on dialysis for the duration of their lives. Many were not able to continue working, and almost all of them are not able to participate in the activities they loved to the same degree.

We also represented families whose loved ones had tragically died. For these families, Fred and his team filed lawsuits under the relevant wrongful death laws.

Company Denies Responsibility for Kidney Failure

Although there was substantial statistical evidence that the product caused the illnesses, the company that made the product did not want to take responsibility for these horrendous injuries and deaths. At first there was a denial of fault, and then there was a fight regarding compensation.

In the end, Fred and his team helped our clients get compensation and justice.

About Attorney Fred Pritzker

Fred has won several other kidney failure cases, including a $4M kidney failure suit settlement for a young woman who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). In that case, our client ate food at a restaurant that was contaminated with E. coli bacteria. The bacteria colonized in her intestines, and a toxin (Shiga toxin) produced by the bacteria traveled to her kidneys, creating tiny blood clots that damaged her kidneys and caused them to shut down.

E. coli
E. coli clings to the lining of the colon using its long, whip-like peritrichous flagellae and finer fimbriae. Image: CDC/ James Archer. Illustrators: Alissa Eckert and Jennifer Oosthuizen.

Fred and his team represent clients in personal injury and wrongful death lawsuits caused by defective medical products, E. coli infection, fire and burn injuries, and accidents. Fred is also a product safety advocate and recently spoke at Harvard Law School and Cornell University.