If E. coli O157 bacteria got into your well or other water system and you rent your home, you may have the right to file a lawsuit against your landlord for compensation. If your young child drank this water, your son or daughter is at risk of developing a serious complication called hemolytic uremic syndrome, which causes kidney failure. Our E. coli lawyers can help you fight for a money settlement to compensate you and your family. Contact our law firm for a free consultation.

E. coli in Well
This well that was contaminated with E. coli bacteria. Our lawyers represented a young child who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome. We won a money settlement from the land owner.

Many types of water are utilized in water supply systems, including groundwater (referred to as aquifers), surface water (lakes and rivers), conservation, and sea water (with use of desalination). Once in the water supply system, the water is usually purified, disinfected, and sometimes fluoridated. Treated water then flows or is pumped to reservoirs. The public supply is accessed from these reservoirs. The wastewater is discharged in a sewer system, leading to a treatment plant. The treated water is discharged into a river, lake, or the sea, or is conserved and reused for landscaping, irrigation, or industrial use.

Groundwater contamination is a growing concern. The technical definition of groundwater is water that lies below the surface of the land. In public usage situations, though, groundwater usually refers to water underground that can be removed by wells, known as aquifers. If an aquifer becomes contaminated, it can affect a wide area and may take years to rectify. The most common sources of groundwater contamination include improper disposal of wastes, faulty septic tanks, lift station sewage leaks, landfills, pesticides, and fertilizers.

Once a source of groundwater for wells becomes contaminated, it can affect the drinking water for miles. In some cases, it is possible to sue for E. coli in a lawsuit for compensation.

Groundwater contamination is a very serious issue. Surveillance data since 1981, compiled by Marshfield Clinic, shows that approximately half of all waterborne disease outbreaks in this country were associated with contaminated groundwater, usually drinking well water contaminated by septic systems.