Invokana or Invokamet – Amputation Lawsuit and Lawyer

Invokana or Invokamet – Amputation Lawsuit and Lawyer

If your leg, foot or toe was amputated after you took Invokana or Invokamet for type 2 diabetes, you may have the right to sue the maker of these drugs, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a Johnson & Johnson company. It will cost you nothing to talk to a lawyer at our law firm about a lawsuit for compensation and justice. Call 1-888-377-8900 (toll free) or use our free consultation form to contact our amputation lawyers, who recently won over $5 million for a client who suffered a traumatic amputation.

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If you have been taking Invokana or Inokamet you need to seek medical attention if you develop new pain or tenderness, sores or ulcers, or infections in your legs or feet. The FDA states: “Do not stop taking your diabetes medicine without first talking to your health care professional.”

What Evidence is There for an Invokana or Invokamet Amputation Lawsuit?

Fred Pritzker and Brendan Flaherty

Attorneys Fred Pritzker and Brendan Flaherty are two of our lead lawyers for these cases. To contact Fred and Brendan, call 1-888-377-8900 (toll free).

Based on new data from two large clinical trials, the FDA “concluded that the type 2 diabetes medicine canagliflozin (Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet XR) causes an increased risk of leg and foot amputations” (FDA Drug Safety Communication). The FDA is now requiring a new Boxed Warning describing this risk to be added to the drug labels of these diabetes medications. This is not a recall, but it provides doctors and patients information on the amputation risk.

Our lawyers are available to talk with you about how this evidence could be used to help you get a settlement payout to compensate you for the loss of your leg, foot and/or toe.  You did not know of this risk when you took this medication, and now you are permanently injured. Call 1-888-377-8900 (toll free).

2 Large Clinical Trials Find Two-Fold Increased Risk of Lower Limb Amputations

Two clinical trials found an approximate 2-fold increased risk of lower limb amputations associated with a medicine called canagliflozin, sold by Janssen Pharmaceuticals under the brand names Invokana® and Invokamet®, both registered trade names.

These were large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials evaluating patients with type 2 diabetes who had either established heart disease or were at risk for it. These clinical trials were named CANVAS (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) and CANVAS-R (A Study of the Effects of Canagliflozin on Renal Endpoints in Adult Participants With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus).

The combined amputation data is as follows:

  • amputations of the toe and mid-foot (99 out of 140 patients with amputations receiving canagliflozin in the two trials);
  • amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee (41 out of 140 patients with amputations receiving canagliflozin in the two trials).

Some patients had more than one amputation, including a few involving more than one limb.

The most common medical events leading to amputation included lower limb infections, gangrene, diabetic foot ulcers, and ischemia. The risk of amputation was highest in patients with a baseline history of prior amputation, peripheral vascular disease, and neuropathy.

The sponsor of both studies was Janssen Research & Development, LLC.

CANVAS Findings

“In CANVAS, the risk of lower limb amputations was 5.9 amputations per 1,000 patients per year for canagliflozin compared to 2.8 amputations per 1,000 patients per year for placebo” (FDA).

This study was started in December of 2009 and the primary completion date was February 22, 2017.

CANVAS Amputations

The CANVAS trial showed that over a year’s time, the risk of amputation for patients in the trial were equivalent to:

  • 5.9 out of every 1,000 patients treated with canagliflozin (sold under the brand names Invokana and Invokamet);
  • 2.8 out of every 1,000 patients treated with placebo.

CANVAS clinical study locations in the United States were as follows:

  • Birmingham, Alabama;
  • Mesa and Tucson, Arizona;
  • La Mesa, Los Gatos, Pismo Beach, Stockton and Walnut Creek, California;
  • Doral, Fort Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Miami and Plantation, Florida;
  • Atlanta and Duluth, Georgia;
  • Boise, Eagle and Meridian, Idaho;
  • Peoria, Illinois;
  • Topeka, Kansas;
  • Crestview Hills and Lexington, Kentucky;
  • Auburn and Scarborough, Maine;
  • Oxon Hill, Maryland;
  • Royal Oak, Michigan;
  • Kansas City and Saint Louis, Missouri;
  • Omaha, Nebraska;
  • Camden, New Jersey;
  • Bronx and Flushing, New York;
  • Chapel Hill and Charlotte, North Carolina;
  • Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Gallipolis, Mentor and Toledo, Ohio;
  • Beaver, Norristown and Sayre, Pennsylvania;
  • Greenville, South Carolina;
  • Kingsport, Tennessee;
  • Dallas, Houston, Odessa, San Antonio and Temple, Texas;
  • Draper, Utah;
  • Salt Lake City, Sandy and West Jordan, Utah;
  • Danville and Richmond, Virginia;
  • Spokane and Tacoma, Washington.

CANVAS-R Findings

“In CANVAS-R, the risk of lower limb amputations was 7.5 amputations per 1,000 patients per year for canagliflozin compared to 4.2 amputations per 1,000 patients per year for placebo. The risk of lower limb amputations was observed at both the 100 mg and 300 mg doses” (FDA).

This study was started in January of 2014 and the primary completion date was February 21, 2017.

The CANVAS-R trial showed that over a year’s time, the risk of amputation for patients in the trial were equivalent to:

  • 7.5 out of every 1,000 patients treated with canagliflozin
  • 4.2 out of every 1,000 patients treated with placebo.

CANVAS-R clinical study locations in the United States were as follows:

  • Little Rock, Arkansas;
  • Carmichael, Concord, Pismo Beach, Roseville and Thousand Oaks, California;
  • Denver, Colorado;
  • Hollywood, Jacksonville, Miami, New Port Richey, Opa Locka, Orlando, Palm Harbor and Tampa, Florida;
  • Meridian, Idaho;
  • Chicago, Illinois;
  • Valparaiso, Indiana;
  • Topeka, Kansas;
  • Louisville, Kentucky;
  • Mandeville and Metairie, Louisiana;
  • Elkridge, Maryland;
  • Flint, Michigan;
  • Picayune, Mississippi;
  • Kansas City, Missouri;
  • St. Louis, Missouri;
  • Washington, Missouri;
  • Omaha, Nebraska;
  • Las Vegas, Nevada;
  • Cornelius, Hickory and Mooresville, North Carolina;
  • Canal Fulton, Franklin and Mason, Ohio;
  • Oklahma City, Oklahoma;
  • Beaver, Levittown, Pennsylvania, Norristown, Pittsburgh and Tipton, Pennsylvania;
  • Greer, South Carolina;
  • Jefferson City, Tennessee;
  • Austin and Pearland, Texas;
  • Bountiful, Draper, Salt Lake City and West Jordan, Utah;
  • South Burlington, Vermont;
  • Falls Church, Norfolk and Virginia Beach, Virginia;
  • Spokane, Washington;
  • Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, Wisconsin.

What is Canagliflozin, the Active Ingredient in Invokana and Invokamet?

The following information is from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration:

  • Canagliflozin is a prescription medicine that is used with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of drugs called sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors.
  • Canagliflozin is available as a single-ingredient product under the brand name Invokana, and also in combination with the diabetes medicine metformin under the brand names Invokamet and Invokamet XR.
  • This drug lowers blood sugar by causing the kidneys to remove sugar from the body through the urine.
  • Other side effects, in addition to the increased risk of medical events requiring amputation, include low blood pressure, a condition of too much acid in the blood called ketoacidosis; kidney problems; a high amount of potassium in the blood; serious urinary tract infections; low blood sugar when combined with other prescription diabetes medicines; yeast infections; bone breaks; and increased cholesterol.

More research is needed regarding the safety of these type 2 diabetes medications. We will alert our readers if there is a recall.

An Experienced Lawyer Can Help You Sue Janssen for a Leg, Foot or Toe Amputation

A Invokana or Invokamet amputation lawsuit against Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Janssen), which developed and manufactured these medications, may allege that the company failed to adequately test the drug and warn of its risks, leading to the loss of a leg, foot and/or toe(s). To prove this, takes an enormous amount of experience and skill. Some of the work that needs to be done includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Using legal measures to obtain all corporate documents concerning the development, manufacture, testing, history, promotion, and labeling of the drugs;
  • Analyzing those documents, possibly hiring medical experts to help with this process;
  • Analyzing the data from the CANVAS and CANVAS-R clinical trials, and again using medical experts;
  • Filing and responding to pretrial “motions,” which are documents that ask the judge to rule on various issues;
  • Settlement negotiations;
  • Preparing for trial; and
  • Arguing a case at a trial, if a settlement is not reached.

Attorneys Fred Pritzker, Brendan Flaherty and David Szerlag are our lead lawyers for these cases. You can contact them using our free consultation form.

Several lawsuits against Janssen for alleged injuries from Invokana have been filed in the United States. “These involve  allegations that ingestion of the drug Invokana may cause a variety of injuries, including diabetic ketoacidosis and kidney damage, and that defendant Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which developed and manufactured the drug, failed to adequately test the drug and warn of its risks” (MDL-2750 Transfer Order).  These suits, which are not a class action, have been consolidated for pretrial procedures only in a process called multidistrict litigation (MDL).

For more information, please see the following:

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